Curing Premature Ejumpulation in Disc Dogs

We’re often asked about the serious disc dog problem of Premature Ejumpulation. Nothing is more frustrating than having an awesome freestyle dog that does everything right and then totally bones out in your toss and fetch round – jumping for discs at 12 feet in the air as they soar under the disc with a heroic leap. Or they over-pursue and try to head off the disc by getting in front of it. Believe me, I know.

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Vault as Leaping Foundation

…dogs that vault well but do not leap well do so because the vault is just a simple foundational leaping drill with concrete and easy to achieve criteria…

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Bent Cavaletti

Cavalettis have been used to adjust horses strides for a long time. The Bent Cavaletti drill is about forcing collection and creating an angle for an interception…

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Heads Up!

Like horses, dogs gallop and there are 2 kinds of gallops, probably a few more, but let’s just talk about two: Head Down If you

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The Case for Front Footed Landings

So the other day I was asked, ”How do I teach my dog to land on all four feet?”

This concept has been floating around the Disc Dog World for a little while and Iʼve not really blared my opinion on it, until today. See, the thing is, you don’t really want a four legged landing. Grab a milkbone and keep reading…

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Interception vs Chase

Most dogs jump for Frisbees because they missed. They have over pursued, ran past the target and make a last ditch effort to make the catch – they jump because they’re out of position and they’ve missed.

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Curving for Collection

This drill combined with short toss and short to medium interception type catch drills can dramatically improve a dog’s patience…

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Throwing With Intent

Throwing with Intent is throwing a disc to your dog with the intent to make them look good. Throwing the disc to promote a big leap, to hit the dog in stride on the run or throwing a disc that your dog is going to flip for 10 yards away, is the sign of a mature handler.

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